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Tokyo Guide: Top 6 Most Popular Art Museums in Ebisu / Nakameguro (July 2019 Ranking)

Tokyo Guide: Top 6 Most Popular Art Museums in Ebisu / Nakameguro (July 2019 Ranking)

Date published: 10 August 2019

Here are the best Art Museums in Ebisu / Nakameguro, with travel tips and more, according to LIVE JAPAN, a top-class travel website for visitors to Japan. Our ranking is based on the most popular pages viewed by foreign visitors in a given category. For instance, ART FRONT GALLERY, Yamatane Museum of Art, Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo and other related spots will be listed. Be sure to check them out during your visit to Ebisu / Nakameguro!

No.1:ART FRONT GALLERY

No.1:ART FRONT GALLERY

Art Front Gallery is commercial art gallery in Daikanyama, close by Shibuya and Ebisu.

Our gallery features contemporary artists, especially those active in Asia. In addition to monthly exhibitions by internationally active artists including Leandro Erlich, Tadashi Kawamata, and Shinji Ohmaki, we maintain a permanent collection of artwork evoking a delicate Japanese atmosphere.

We also offer works of art from popular artists whose pieces decorate some of the top hotels in Tokyo, from large pieces to small souvenir-size items, and from works on canvas to glass and ceramics. Art is also available through the café at the nearby T-SITE building.

Working alongside artists participating in the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale and the Setouchi Triennale, our gallery space provides project information. Artworks which question the spirituality and social nature of the era portray the essence of the current art scene in Japan. We appreciate if you could contact us prior to your visit. We will await you with artwork that you may be interested in.

No.2:Yamatane Museum of Art

No.2:Yamatane Museum of Art

It is located at 10-minute walk from the west exit of the JR Ebisu Station or the Exit No. 2 of the Ebisu Station on the Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line. The Yamatane Museum of Art was opened in Kabutocho in 1966 as Japan’s first museum specializing in Japanese paintings.

In 2009, the museum was moved to its current location in Hiroo, Shibuya Ward and reopened as a new museum. The museum houses about 1,800 works that mainly consist of modern and contemporary Japanese paintings from the Meiji era (1868-1912) to the present, including ancient paintings, ukiyo-e woodblock prints, and oil paintings. It holds various seasonal, thematic exhibitions five to six times a year.

The first basement floor has showrooms and is about 650 square meters in area. These showrooms employ a unique lighting system not to distract visitors from appreciating the Japanese paintings. There are also a museum shop and a café. Museum-original goods inspired by the displayed artworks and cafe-original Japanese sweets are highly popular.

No.3:Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo

No.3:Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo

A museum opened in Meguro, Tokyo in 1987 with the aim of providing a place for local people to casually enjoy art. It mainly collects and displays modern and contemporary Japanese art. The fine pieces of art created by various artists are systematically introduced in the exhibitions.

Works inspired by Western artists and works which received high reputations at international exhibitions are displayed. The museum selects works to figure out Japanese modern and contemporary art through the relationship with the outside of Japan. Even though it does not have the permanent exhibition, special exhibitions are frequently held with various perspectives and themes as well as with works of famous artists.

The museum also organizes workshops and lets the Kumin Gallery space in the premises to those who want to show their own works to public. It is located in the Meguro Citizen’s Center, a 10-minute walk from JR Meguro Station.

No.4:Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

No.4:Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

Tokyo Metropolitan Museum is a comprehensive art museum focusing on photography and film. It opened in June 1990 to enrich and develop the culture of photography and film in Japan.

It is a museum that is rare even around the world, and currently owns many valuable works. The collection numbers approximately 30,528 items (as of the end of March 2014). Although it has its roots in the 20th-century style analog print photography, it continues to record developments in photography and film . It is a museum where you can learn about the history and cultural development of photography. The museum is inside Yebisu Garden Place, within walking distance of JR Ebisu Station.

No.5:Museum of Comporary Sculpture

No.5:Museum of Comporary Sculpture

The Museum of Contemporary Sculpture was built on the grounds of Chosenin Temple, a religious corporation, as a part of its proselytization activities. The museum houses 250 sculptures by 57 contemporary sculptors, most of whom are Japanese sculptors from the second half of the 20th century and later.

One of the features of the museum is that visitors can actually touch and feel most of the artworks. You can appreciate the artworks through touch, and not just with your eyes. The museum consists of an impressive hexagonal main building with indoor exhibition space, and four outdoor exhibition areas that include the bronze garden with a staircase and the stone sculpture exhibition space with an impressive stone gate. They hold seasonal exhibitions of the permanent collection, private exhibitions and special exhibitions of young artists. The admission is free but you must sign in at the entrance. Take the Tokyu bus for Sangenjaya from JR Meguro station and get off at the Shizen-en stop. It is a 3-minute walk from the bus stop.

No.6:Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

No.6:Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

This art museum, which opened its doors in 1983, is out of ordinary among other museums in Tokyo. Located in the middle of the city, the museum harmonizes its art exhibitions, which utilize the former official residence of Asaka-no-miya (a branch of the Japanese Imperial Family) constructed in the early Showa period employing an Art Deco style, and the lushly green garden. After improvement of the old building, and an extension for a gallery and a cafe was added, the museum was re-opened in November 2014. In front of the art museum, there is a wide spread of lawn. You can put down a mat and eat your meal on this lawn.

*This information is from the time of this article's publication.
*Prices and options mentioned are subject to change.
*Unless stated otherwise, all prices include tax.

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