Stay Warm with Art in 2018: Tokyo's 8 Best Exhibitions in January - March

Stay Warm with Art in 2018: Tokyo's 8 Best Exhibitions in January - March

Update: 28 January 2018

With winter illuminations and New Year’s celebrations, January in Tokyo isn't just cold but also very atmospheric - and what better way to stay warm in winter than strolling through Tokyo's exhibitions and galleries while losing yourself in art and culture?

Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing

Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing

Leandro Erlich is an internationally acclaimed artist from Argentina who will host his largest solo exhibition ever at Roppongi’s Mori Arts Center Gallery. It will vividly showcase his works and development of the past 25 years, offering an intriguing glimpse into the world of the fascinating artist.
Making use of visual illusion, Leandro Erlich will whisk you away to an almost magical world of art. On the first glance, the sceneries he creates are already astounding, but you will discover a new detail and secret if you allow yourself to be totally immersed. Through this, experience first-hand what the difference between “seeing” and “believing” is.

Period: November 18, 2017 – April 1, 2018
Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. (last entry at 9:30 p.m.)
Admission: 1,800 yen (regular)
Closed: always open
* Note that the exhibition closes at 5:00 p.m. (last admission 4:30 p.m.) on Tuesdays.

  • Mori Art Museum
    • Address 6-10-1, Roppongi Roppongi Hills forest tower 53F, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 106-6153
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    • Nearest Station Roppongi Station (Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line / Toei Oedo Line)
    • Phone Number 03-5777-8600

Yayoi Kusama Museum: Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art

Yayoi Kusama Museum: Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art
© Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama – undoubtedly, she is one of the world’s most prominent and characteristic contemporary artists, having captured the hearts and minds of millions all around the globe with her mesh patterns and polka dot motifs. The Yayoi Kusama Museum opened in October 2017 to commemorate her amazing point of view and “Creation is a Solitary Pursuit, Love is What Brings You Closer to Art” is its inaugural exhibition.
Look forward to not only 16 works from her newest painting series “My Eternal Soul,” but also the “Love Forever” series, a new pumpkin, and an installation that Yayoi Kusama made especially for the museum.
(Please purchase times tickets online in advance for a 90-minute slot.)

Date: October 1 (Sun) to February 25 (Sun), 2018
Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Admission: 1,000 yen (regular)
Closed: Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays

  • Yayoi Kusama Museum
    草間彌生美術館
    • Address 107, Bentencho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 1620851, Japan

Snoopy Museum: Love is Wonderful

Snoopy Museum: Love is Wonderful
© Peanuts Worldwide LLC

Tokyo’s Snoopy Museum is the world’s first satellite museum of the famous Charles M. Schulz Museum in California. It’s a temporary museum, however, open for about 2 years since April 2016, and every few months, the theme of Snoopy Museum changes entirely.
The current theme is “Love,” or “Love is Wonderful,” to be precise. It focuses on all the episodes and comics of Snoopy and the Peanuts where love played a major role, beautifully illustrated by original artworks and images. Do make sure to also stop by the museum shop, as many original goods fitting “Love” are on sale for a limited time. They make for excellent and adorable souvenirs, not only for Peanuts fans!

Period: October 7, 2017 – April 8, 2018
Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. (last entry at 7:30 p.m.)
Admission: 1,800 yen (advance sales), 2,000 yen (regular)
Closed: Always open (expect December 31 – January 2)

  • Snoopy Museum Tokyo
    スヌーピーミュージアム
    • Address 5-6-20, Roppongi , Minato-ku, Tokyo, 1060032, Japan

Tower of the Sun 1967–2018: What did Tarō Okamoto Question

Tower of the Sun 1967–2018: What did Tarō Okamoto Question

Taro Okamoto’s famous Tower of the Sun, one of Osaka’s main landmarks, is finally being reopened in March 2018 after extensive seismic retrofitting work. To accompany this momentous occasion, Tokyo’s Taro Okamoto Memorial Museum hosts an exhibition that focuses on the artist’s thoughts and ideas behind the Tower of the Sun, tracing its long history from 1967 until 2018.
This exhibition is about more than the artwork itself, however. It is a profile of Japanese history seen through the lens of art. Discover just what impact and meaning the Tower of the Sun, affectionately called a “living thing” by Taro Okamoto himself, had for post-war Japan.

Period: October 13, 2017 – February 18, 2018
Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (last admission at 5:30 p.m.)
Admission: 620 yen (regular)
Closed: Tuesdays (open on public holidays), New Year’s (December 28 – January 4), and maintenance days.

Hokusai and Japonisme

Hokusai and Japonisme
(右)葛飾北斎《冨嶽三十六景 東海道程ヶ谷》1830-33(天保元-4)年頃 横大判錦絵 25.7×37.8cm ミネアポリス美術館  (左)クロード・モネ《陽を浴びるポプラ並木》1891年 油彩、カンヴァス 93×73.5cm 国立西洋美術館(松方コレクション)Minneapolis Institute of Art, Bequest of Richard P. Gale 74.1.237 Photo: Minneapolis Institute of Art

From the beginning of the 17th century, Japan entered a time of isolation, having barely any contact with the rest of the world – especially the West. Once Japan opened its ports again in the middle of the 19th century, visitors and traders from overseas were entirely fascinated by the country’s beautiful works of art, the likes of which they had never seen before. This fascination led to a phenomenon called “Japonisme,” a movement that incorporated Japanese methods of drawing, painting, and more into the Western art world.
One of the most influential artists of this time was Katsushika Hokusai, the ukiyo-e master most famous for “The Great Wave off Kanagawa.” The exhibition “Hokusai and Japonisme” showcases both around 220 Western masterpieces from artists such as Monet and Gauguin, as well as 40 of Hokusai’s famous ukiyo-e prints, and 110 other items, including 70 woodblock-printed books. This allows you to look for the connection between the styles for yourself and to discover Japonisme for yourself and first-hand, so to speak.

Period: October 21, 2017 – January 28, 2018
Hours: 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (open until 8:00 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays)
※Last admission until 30 minutes before closing time.
Admission: 1,600 yen
Closed: Mondays (open on January 8), December 28 – January 1, January 9

  • The National Museum of Western Art
    • Address Ueno-koen Park 7-7, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-0007
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    • Nearest Station Ueno Station (Hokkaido Shinkansen Line / Tohoku Shinkansen Line / Akita Shinkansen Line / Yamagata Shinkansen Line / Joetsu Shinkansen Line / Hokuriku Shinkansen Line / JR Keihin-Tohoku Line / JR Yamanote Line / JR Tohoku Main Line / JR Utsunomiya Line / JR Takasaki Line / JR Joban Line / JR Ueno Tokyo Line / Tokyo Metro Ginza Line / Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line)
      1 minute on foot
    • Phone Number 03-5777-8600

100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 2: Minna no Uta, Everyone’s Songs

100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 2: Minna no Uta, Everyone’s Songs

Japanese anime celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2017! The exhibition “100 Years of Japanese Animation Part 2: Minna no Uta,” or Everybody’s Songs uses this occasion to take a closer look at the history of the show “Minna no Uta.”
The program dates back to 1961 and thus boasts the title of one of NHK’s (Japan’s national public broadcaster) longest-running shows. The 5-minute long episodes run several times a day, being aimed at both children and adults and doesn’t only highly songs and singers but also animators and directors. In this exhibition, you’ll get to see various animations of the last decades, including original art, songs, and materials all about the iconic show.

Period: January 18 – March 25, 2018
Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (last entry at 5:30 p.m.)
Closes at 4:00 p.m. on the last day of the exhibition.
Admission: free
Closed: Mondays (or the following day if Monday is a national holiday)

The Empire of Imagination and Science of Rudolf II

The Empire of Imagination and Science of Rudolf II
ルーラント・サーフェリー 《動物に音楽を奏でるオルフェウス》 1625年、油彩・キャンヴァス、プラハ国立美術館、チェコ共和国 The National Gallery in Prague Roelandt Savery, “Orpheus charming the animals.” 1625, oil on panel. The National Gallery in Prague

The Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II was – and still is – known as an avid collector. Between the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th, he managed to gather masterpieces of both art and science from all around the world, making his court a major base for creativity and scientific advancement. The exhibition “The Empire of Imagination and Science of Rudolf II” shows 80 of his most fascinating possessions, most them paintings and prints. Especially the humorous works of Giuseppe Arcimboldo and his “fruit faces” are in the spotlight, one of Rudolf II’s most favorite artists.
The Holy Roman Emperor’s fascination for alchemy and astrology is represented by numerous precious tools and rare documents, opening the doors to a magical world filled with art, science, and creativity. Rudolf II’s passion can vividly felt right to this day and you’ll find yourself touched and inspired over the span of centuries.

Date: January 6 (Sat) to March 11 (Sun), 2018
Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (last admission at 5:30 p.m.)
Open until 9:00 p.m. (last admission at 8:30 p.m.) on Fridays and Saturdays.
Admission: 1,600 yen (regular)
Closed: January 16 (Tue), February 13 (Tue)

  • Bunkamura
    • Address 2-24-1, Dogenzaka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8507
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    • Nearest Station Shibuya Station (JR Shonan Shinjuku Line / JR Yamanote Line / JR Saikyo Line / Tokyo Metro Ginza Line / Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line / Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line / Tokyu Toyoko Line / Tokyu Den-en-toshi Line / Keio Inokashira Line)
      5 minutes on foot
    • Phone Number 03-3477-9111

Brueghel: 150 Years of an Artistic Dynasty

Brueghel: 150 Years of an Artistic Dynasty

The Brueghels were one of Europe’s most influential painter families between the 16th and 17th century. This exhibition showcases about 100 of their most prominent masterpieces, centering on works from private collections. “Brueghel: 150 Years of an Artistic Dynasty” follows the footsteps of the famous Pieter Brueghel I to his two sons, his grandchildren, and even grand-grandchildren – trace a generation of talents through the eyes of nine different artists, expressing their favorite interpretation of Flemish painting.
Voice guidance throughout the exhibition is available in Japanese, English, and Chinese, allowing you to fully immerse yourself in colors and brushstrokes!

Date: January 23 (Tue) to April 1 (Sun), 2018
Hours: 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Open until 8:00 p.m. (last admission at 30 minutes before closing) on Fridays.
Admission: 1,600 yen (regular)
Closed: Mondays, February 13 (Tue)
※Open on February 12.

  • Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum
    • Address 8-36, Uenokouen, Taitou-ku, Tokyo, 110-0007
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    • Nearest Station Ueno Station (Hokkaido Shinkansen Line / Tohoku Shinkansen Line / Akita Shinkansen Line / Yamagata Shinkansen Line / Joetsu Shinkansen Line / Hokuriku Shinkansen Line / JR Keihin-Tohoku Line / JR Yamanote Line / JR Tohoku Main Line / JR Utsunomiya Line / JR Takasaki Line / JR Joban Line / JR Ueno Tokyo Line / Tokyo Metro Ginza Line / Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line)
      7 minutes on foot
    • Phone Number 03-3823-6921
*This information is from the time of this article's publication.

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