HOME Tokyo and Surroundings Tokyo Tsukiji Enjoy ancient Japanese tales with great food and incredible projection mapping!
Enjoy ancient Japanese tales with great food and incredible projection mapping!

Enjoy ancient Japanese tales with great food and incredible projection mapping!

Date published: 13 February 2020
Last updated: 17 February 2020

From the adventures of Momotaro to the magical journey of Urashima Taro, imaging dining while projection mapping tells these traditional Japanese fairy tales. That’s the experience this restaurant has started offering. Just what does such an experience entail!? Let’s get right into the action!

Table of Contents
  1. The Palace of the Dragon King hidden away in Tsukiji: Japanese Cuisine “Nazuki”
  2. Make your main take-away from this place the picture book-styled menu to remind you of your experiences here
  3. Outside the establishment: a Boba tea store

The Palace of the Dragon King hidden away in Tsukiji: Japanese Cuisine “Nazuki”

The Palace of the Dragon King hidden away in Tsukiji: Japanese Cuisine “Nazuki”

This time, we’ll be introducing a traditional Japanese cuisine restaurant, “Nazuki”, and their new menu unveiled on January 20, 2020. Keeping Japanese cuisine as the motif for their course menu, the first wave of courses has been released which include 2 courses: the “Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course” and the “Tsuru-no-Ongaeshi Course”.

Nazuki is a restaurant specializing in Japanese cuisine that unveiled their take on dining experiences by reopening as a restaurant offering 360-degree projection mapping together with great food that tantalizes the 5 senses using carefully selected ingredients that bring out the full essence of the 4 seasons.

As one might expect, for a restaurant whose concept is melding the old and the new, they serve traditional dishes with a modern twist alongside digital art techniques, making the establishment’s atmosphere one that deviates from the everyday experience.

Other than the main hall of 90 seats, they also have 2 VIP rooms that fit a maximum of 10 people, as well as a special “Hanare” section for those visiting as a group via tour buses that can support from as many as 100 people at a time.

This time, we tried out the “Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course” and “Tsuru-no-Ongaeshi Course” inside Hanare.

Make your main take-away from this place the picture book-styled menu to remind you of your experiences here

Both courses are available at lunch and dinner time, and cost 7800-yen each, with a drink buffet add-on for 2000 yen.

Similarly, both courses comprise of 5 scenes each, with each part of the course served after the scene finishes playing via the projection mapping.

The menu which you use to make your order is designed like a picture book. The text comes in English as well and makes a perfect pastime as you wait for your order, not to mention a great souvenir for your friends and family back home.

“Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course” Menu

While we can’t share too many spoilers here, the movie consists of animations and music only, so even without knowledge of the Japanese language anyone can still enjoy the show.

Projection mapping image

Some highlights of the Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course: Zenzai no otsukuri moriawase (a smorgasbord of sashimi), Shiizakana (steamed akaza ebi shrimp in sakura ebi sauce with wild vegetable dressing, grilled Japanese bluefish with bamboo shoot salad coupled with crab chawanmushi and roast wagyu beef and a side of ginger sushi), Shokuji (smoked kaisendon with red miso soup), and lastly Mizugashi (a platter of dessert).

The dishes from the “Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course” (Clockwise from upper left: Zenzai no otsukuri moriawase, Shiizakana, Shokuji, Mizugashi)

For the “Tsuru-no-Ongaeshi Course”, Sakizuke (thinly sliced blowfish sashimi), Gyoryori (grilled Japanese bluefish with awayuki sauce, wild vegetable tempura and seasonal vegetables, bamboo shoot salad, sakura shrimp, bigfin reef squid, and abalone steamed silkily in thin starchy sauce), Nikuryori (roast wagyu beef, vegetable terrine, yellow mustard, roasted vegetables and onion chips drenched with starchy bitter orange sauce), Shokuji (a sushi platter), and lastly Mizugashi (dessert platter).

The dishes that come with the “Tsuru-no-Ongaeshi Course”: Clockwise from the upper-left, Nikuryori, Mizugashi, Shokuji, Gyoryori and Sakizuke.
While each dish is overflowing with its unique charm, the one that charmed us the most personally was the smoked kaisendon from the “Tale of the Bamboo Cutter Course”. As soon as you open the bowl the fragrance of the smoke envelops you, as if re-enacting the scene where the princess from the moon Kaguya descended to the earth to visit…

Japanese folklore, tales that the Japanese all know but at the same time seem unfamiliar. Experiencing these stories through movies and food made for an enlightening experience indeed.

Nazuki only operates during lunch from 11:00 to 15:30 (Last order at 15:00) and dinner between 17:30 to 22:00. Their main specialties are the Sashimi Gozen during lunch at 1850-yen (tax inclusive) and the “Katsugyo Course” during dinner at 8000-yen (tax and service charge not inclusive).

Outside the establishment: a Boba tea store

Outside the establishment: a Boba tea store

If you’re feeling rather parched or have cravings for something sugary, there’s a boba tea store located in the first floor of the same building as Nazuki. Manpuku Chakichi is run by the same management as Nazuki, specializing in healthy boba tea that also contains beautifying nutrients.

After the meal we ordered a medium iced matcha milk. After informing the staff that we were not good with regular milk, they used almond milk for our drink instead. A faint sweetness to top the aroma of the matcha.

Written by Shōko Kamiguchi

*This information is from the time of this article's publication.
*Prices and options mentioned are subject to change.
*Unless stated otherwise, all prices include tax.

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