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Aizu-Wakamatsu Guide (Fukushima): A Day in the City of Sake and Samurai

Aizu-Wakamatsu Guide (Fukushima): A Day in the City of Sake and Samurai

Date published: 20 February 2024

Plan your perfect trip to Aizu-Wakamatsu with our insider’s guide. Discover the top historical sites, local specialties, and unique experiences while making memories to last a lifetime.

North of Tokyo, in the mountains of Fukushima Prefecture, lies the small city of Aizu-Wakamatsu. Chock-full of preserved historical sites, rich samurai culture, and award-winning local sake - but without all of the crowds - Aizu-Wakamatsu is a no-brainer when it comes to filling up your itinerary with unique destinations in Japan. Let us help you plan your next trip and hit all of the local favorites with this insider’s guide to the sake and samurai culture of Aizu-Wakamatsu.

(Main image: Expedition Japan)

Table of Contents
  1. What makes Aizu-Wakamatsu special?
  2. How to get to Aizu-Wakamatsu
  3. How to get around Aizu-Wakamatsu
  4. What is there to do in Aizu-Wakamatsu?
  5. Where to stay in Aizu-Wakamatsu
  6. Is Aizu-Wakamatsu Worth It?
  7. Recommended tours of Aizu-Wakamatsu

What makes Aizu-Wakamatsu special?

Citizens of Aizu-Wakamatsu keep the samurai spirit alive during a battle reenactment in front of Tsurugajo Castle. (Photo courtesy of Fukushima Travel.)
Citizens of Aizu-Wakamatsu keep the samurai spirit alive during a battle reenactment in front of Tsurugajo Castle. (Photo courtesy of Fukushima Travel.)

Three things: Samurai, sake, and ease of travel.

Owing to its ideal location surrounded by mountain ranges, Aizu-Wakamatsu was one of the last samurai strongholds of the Edo period (1603 to 1868) and played a critical role during the Boshin War, a civil war that ended in the fall of the samurai.

The Aizu Domain was ruled from Tsurugajo Castle and the once-bustling castle town below evolved into the Aizu-Wakamatsu we know today, leaving behind historic samurai residences, old storehouses and sake breweries, and other unmistakable remnants from its feudal past.

The pure water flowing from the surrounding mountains also created the perfect environment to grow top-quality rice, a skill which the castle town residents quickly honed into brewing famously smooth Aizu sake.

While sake is produced all over Japan, the quality of Aizu-Wakamatsu water and rice cannot be replicated, and you can sample premium sake straight from the source at many of the breweries across town.

Enjoy premium sake in Aizu-Wakamatsu - brewed locally, and beloved internationally. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Enjoy premium sake in Aizu-Wakamatsu - brewed locally, and beloved internationally. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

To top it all off, Aizu-Wakamatsu has some of the most convenient public transportation we’ve ever seen, thanks to a sightseeing bus that constantly runs a loop of all of the inner-city tourist destinations.

Forget about hailing a taxi or making complicated train transfers, families and solo travelers alike can travel with ease throughout the city.

How to get to Aizu-Wakamatsu

Getting to Aizu-Wakamatsu from Tokyo is quicker than you would think, thanks to the Shinkansen bullet train. (Photo: PIXTA)
Getting to Aizu-Wakamatsu from Tokyo is quicker than you would think, thanks to the Shinkansen bullet train. (Photo: PIXTA)

From Tokyo, it takes approximately 3 hours by train to reach Aizu-Wakamatsu, including one transfer.

By rail From JR Tokyo Station, take the JR Tohoku Shinkansen “Yamabiko” to JR Koriyama Station (8,740 yen/1 hour 20 minutes). From JR Koriyama Station, transfer to the JR Ban'etsu West Line towards Aizu-Wakamatsu and disembark at JR Aizu-Wakamatsu Station (1,170 yen/1 hour 15 minutes).

Fares are covered by the JR EAST PASS (Tohoku Area), the JR East-South Hokkaido Rail Pass, and the Japan Rail Pass.

How to get around Aizu-Wakamatsu

The Haikara-san Line sightseeing bus (pictured above) runs on a counter-clockwise loop every 30 minutes. The Akabe Line runs on a clockwise loop every 60 minutes. (Photo courtesy of Fukushima Travel.)
The Haikara-san Line sightseeing bus (pictured above) runs on a counter-clockwise loop every 30 minutes. The Akabe Line runs on a clockwise loop every 60 minutes. (Photo courtesy of Fukushima Travel.)

The Aizu Bus sightseeing loop bus is the simplest way to get around once in Aizu-Wakamatsu. Every location in this article is accessible by the loop bus, with the nearest bus stop listed for your convenience.

The bus runs in a counter-clockwise loop on the Haikara-san Line every 30 minutes and clockwise on the Akabe Line every 60 minutes, stopping at 39 stops along the main tourist route. Haikara-san Line bus stops are numbered H1 through H39 and Akabe Line bus stops are numbered A1 through A39.

One-day bus passes are sold for 600 yen/person (300 yen for elementary school students) at the Aizu Bus Ekimae Information Center in front of Aizu-Wakamatsu Station. Showing your pass at the entrance of certain attractions, such as Tsurugajo Castle Tower, will even get you a discount on admission!

Check the map here for the bus route and to see which locations offer discounts: Sightseeing by Haikara-san & Akabe Town Bus is very convenient.

What is there to do in Aizu-Wakamatsu?

With plenty of sights to see and local specialties to try in Aizu-Wakamatsu, choosing where to go can quickly become overwhelming!

We’ve put together a simple course of places to visit in Aizu-Wakamatsu, each easily accessible on the sightseeing loop bus.

Start at Aizu-Wakamatsu Station and follow the order of this list, or start anywhere on the loop to begin your journey!

1. Suehiro Sake Brewery: Free Tours and Tasting at a Historic Brewery

Blast to the past: The nostalgic wooden shop front greets visitors to Suehiro Sake Brewery. (Photo: PIXTA)
Blast to the past: The nostalgic wooden shop front greets visitors to Suehiro Sake Brewery. (Photo: PIXTA)

Nearest Bus Stop: Yamatomachi H8 (1-minute walk)/Otonamachi A31 (2-minute walk)

Established in 1850, this brewery has been managed by seven successive generations of the local Suehiro family. Their award-winning sake is exported all over the world, and the friendly staff offer free tours of their brewery. Tours are in Japanese, so we recommend bringing a bilingual tour guide along to get the most out of the experience.

The inside of Suehiro is modern and spacious while keeping a retro touch. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
The inside of Suehiro is modern and spacious while keeping a retro touch. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

A tour of the brewery takes about 30 minutes, where you will visit the production warehouse and learn about the water-controlled cooling system, the rice used to make the sake, and how the sake itself is made before ending with a complimentary sake-tasting experience. Suehiro usually offers five or six kinds of sake that you can try, so you can compare and decide your favorite type before purchasing a bottle to take home if you’d like.

Find your favorite sake to take home at the end of the tour. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Find your favorite sake to take home at the end of the tour. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

To participate in a tour, call ahead and check availability before visiting the brewery (in Japanese only). Drop-in visitors are also welcome to enter the brewery and purchase sake without participating in a tour.

  • Suehiro Sake Brewery
    末廣酒造 嘉永蔵
    • Address 12-38 Nisshinmachi, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0861
    • Nearest Station ・Hours: Open daily 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Phone Number 0242-27-0002
    • Website: http://www.sake-suehiro.jp/

2. Tsurugajo Castle: The site of the Samurai’s last stand

Once controlled by powerful samurai, Tsurugajo Castle looms over the castle park below. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)
Once controlled by powerful samurai, Tsurugajo Castle looms over the castle park below. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)

Nearest Bus Stop: Tsurugajo Iriguchi H14/A27 (5-minute walk)

Selected as one of the Top 100 Japanese Castles and home to the last courageous stand of the samurai of the Aizu Domain, this magnificent castle is a testament to the loyalty and perseverance of Aizu samurai.

In late 1968, the Imperialist Satcho Alliance attacked the castle in a brutal onslaught during what came to be known as the Boshin War.

Despite the Imperialist forces’ use of Western artillery, the castle and samurai within fought bravely and withstood the siege for over a month, only surrendering when they accepted that there was no hope left.

Only in Aizu: The signature deep red roof tiles are unique to Tsurugajo Castle. (Photo: PIXTA)
Only in Aizu: The signature deep red roof tiles are unique to Tsurugajo Castle. (Photo: PIXTA)

While the castle itself is a reconstruction completed in the 1960s, the stone gates are original, unable to be destroyed by pro-Imperial Court sieges. The burgundy-tiled roof is the only one of its kind in Japan, painted the same color that the castle town residents would have looked up at every day.

A feat of architecture: Still standing after over 400 years, the stone walls surrounding the castle were built without adhesive of any kind. (Photo: PIXTA)
A feat of architecture: Still standing after over 400 years, the stone walls surrounding the castle were built without adhesive of any kind. (Photo: PIXTA)

Visitors can climb to the top floor of the castle for a panoramic view of the surrounding mountains and the city below, and enjoy the attractive castle museum featuring real samurai armor, weapons, and other historical artifacts.

A scenic view from the top of Tsurugajo Castle on a winter day. (Photo: PIXTA)
A scenic view from the top of Tsurugajo Castle on a winter day. (Photo: PIXTA)

For a truly special experience, we recommend ending your visit to the castle with a cup of authentic matcha green tea at Rinkaku Japanese Tea Room.

Located within the castle grounds, this tea ceremony room was built by the lord of Aizu for the son of the famous tea master Sen no Rikyu.

The tea house features traditional tatami straw mats, a thatched roof, and a beautiful Japanese garden, perfect for gazing at while enjoying some green tea.

Head outside on a nice day to enjoy your tea in the tea room’s garden, complete with a view of the castle in the background. (Photo: PIXTA)
Head outside on a nice day to enjoy your tea in the tea room’s garden, complete with a view of the castle in the background. (Photo: PIXTA)
  • Tsuruga Castle
    鶴ヶ城
    • Address 1-1 Otemachi, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0873
    • Phone Number 0242-27-4005
    • Website: http://www.tsurugajo.com/

3. Aizu Bukeyashiki: Walk through an authentic samurai village

Faithful reconstructions of grand samurai residences and other Edo period buildings welcome visitors to Aizu Bukeyashiki. (Photo: PIXTA)
Faithful reconstructions of grand samurai residences and other Edo period buildings welcome visitors to Aizu Bukeyashiki. (Photo: PIXTA)

Nearest Bus Stop: Aizu Bukeyashiki H24/H30/A11/A17 (1-minute walk)

This open-air museum consists of reconstructed samurai residences from the Edo period, the pinnacle being the mansion of Tanomo Saigo, chief advisor to the Aizu Clan. Featuring 38 rooms, the complex is filled with wax figures depicting the everyday lives of samurai families.

Frozen in time: Wax figures depict the daily activities of samurai and others who lived in the complex. (Photo: PIXTA)
Frozen in time: Wax figures depict the daily activities of samurai and others who lived in the complex. (Photo: PIXTA)

Walking through the museum, you will find Japanese gardens, a teahouse, a rice mill, and a bailiff’s office, among other historical reconstructions.

Also on-site is a souvenir and crafts shop featuring handmade items from Aizu-Wakamatsu and various activity workshops such as archery (200 yen/4 arrows), Aizu traditional akabeko (legendary red cow) figurine painting (1,250 yen), and traditional okiagari-koboshi doll-making classes (1,250 yen).

Cute and useful: One of the most well-known symbols of Aizu, the akabeko bobblehead doll is said to ward off illnesses and was often given as a toy to Aizu children during the Edo period. (Photo: PIXTA)
Cute and useful: One of the most well-known symbols of Aizu, the akabeko bobblehead doll is said to ward off illnesses and was often given as a toy to Aizu children during the Edo period. (Photo: PIXTA)

For lunch, check out Kuyoutei, one of the on-site restaurants serving local Aizu specialties such as kozuyu, a regional dish made with dried scallop dashi and various seasonal vegetables.

Typical Aizu kozuyu made with various local vegetables in a clear dashi broth. (Image photo. Credit: PIXTA)
Typical Aizu kozuyu made with various local vegetables in a clear dashi broth. (Image photo. Credit: PIXTA)
  • Aizu Bukeyashiki
    会津武家屋敷
    • Address Innai-1-1 Higashiyamamachi Oaza Ishiyama, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0813
    • Phone Number 0242-28-2525
    • ・Open daily 8:30 AM - 4:55 PM

4. Sazaedo Temple: Complete a 2-month pilgrimage in 2 minutes!

A short stair-climb or moving-walkway-ride up Mt. Iimoriyama, Sazaedo is the only spiral-shaped temple in Japan. (Photo Courtesy of Expedition Japan.)
A short stair-climb or moving-walkway-ride up Mt. Iimoriyama, Sazaedo is the only spiral-shaped temple in Japan. (Photo Courtesy of Expedition Japan.)

Get off the sightseeing bus at the base of Mt. Iimoriyama and pass through the souvenir street to reach the path of 183 stairs that leads to Sazaedo Temple. While the stairs are quite steep, there is a paid moving walkway (up only) to the right that can take you to the top without breaking a sweat for 250 yen/person.

The infamous Mt. Iimoriyama stairs (left) and moving walkway (right). (Photo: PIXTA)
The infamous Mt. Iimoriyama stairs (left) and moving walkway (right). (Photo: PIXTA)

Once you reach the top, you cannot miss Sazaedo Temple. This uniquely-shaped Buddhist temple was built entirely out of wood in 1796, earning it the nickname “Sazaedo” for its resemblance to the spiral shell of a horned turban (sazae). The only temple in Japan with this unique design, Sazaedo is designated as an Important Cultural Property.

The staircase inside Sazaedo Temple is split into two spirals - those going up will never pass those on the way down. (Credit: Aizuwakamatsu Tourism Bureau)
The staircase inside Sazaedo Temple is split into two spirals - those going up will never pass those on the way down. (Credit: Aizuwakamatsu Tourism Bureau)

What you’ll find inside is even more perplexing - a double-helix spiral staircase that leads up and down the pagoda, but no floors. Along the climb you will pass 33 statues of Kannon, the bodhisattva of mercy. The monk who designed the temple wanted to replicate the Saigoku 33 Kannon Pilgrimage, a grueling route that passes through 7 prefectures and takes months to complete, so that ordinary people could pay respects to all 33 Kannon in a matter of minutes. The countless senjafuda - colorful paper stickers used by pilgrims as proof of their visit - pasted on the ceiling and walls of the temple stand as a testament to the monk’s success.

Senjafuda, plastered across the walls and ceiling, remains proof of the countless pilgrims who have visited Sazaedo over the centuries. (Credit: Aizuwakamatsu Tourism Bureau)
Senjafuda, plastered across the walls and ceiling, remains proof of the countless pilgrims who have visited Sazaedo over the centuries. (Credit: Aizuwakamatsu Tourism Bureau)

5. Graves of the Byakkotai: A memorial to the dark history of samurai

A line of headstones marks the graves of a group of young samurai who took their own lives on Mt. Iimoriyama during the Boshin War. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)
A line of headstones marks the graves of a group of young samurai who took their own lives on Mt. Iimoriyama during the Boshin War. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)

Nearest Bus Stop: Iimoriyama Shita A5/H36 (5-minute walk)

A stark contrast to the fun atmosphere of Sazaedo Temple, the surrounding grounds tell the story of a dark and harrowing past. Beside the temple, you will find a statue of a samurai, commemorating the tragic fate of a group of young warriors in the Byakkotai (White Tiger Corps) who took their lives on the mountain in 1868. The group consisted of around 300 members ranging from ages 15 to 17, and was meant to be a reserve unit during the Boshin War in the fight against the Imperialist forces.

Moments before tragedy: Statue of a young Byakkotai warrior, capturing the moment in time that he witnessed Tsurugajo Castle burning. (Photo: PIXTA)
Moments before tragedy: Statue of a young Byakkotai warrior, capturing the moment in time that he witnessed Tsurugajo Castle burning. (Photo: PIXTA)

Cut off from the rest of their unit during a battle, 20 of the boys retreated up Mt. Iimoriyama, overlooking the castle town. Mistaking smoke rising from the castle as a sign of defeat, and believing that their lord and families had been killed, the boys gathered and committed seppuku - ritual suicide. Little did they know that the castle would still hold out for another two weeks. Their graves are at the summit of the mountain, the spot serving as a memorial for the young samurai and commemorates their ultimate sacrifice and show of loyalty. Visitors come daily to pay their respects and look out over the same landscape that the boys saw that day.

The boys observed the destruction of their town from this vantage point on Mt. Iimoriyama. Tsurugajo Castle is on the left, far behind the row of trees in the distance. (Photo: PIXTA)
The boys observed the destruction of their town from this vantage point on Mt. Iimoriyama. Tsurugajo Castle is on the left, far behind the row of trees in the distance. (Photo: PIXTA)
  • Graves of the Byakkotai "White Tiger Force"
    白虎隊士十九士の墓
    • Address Takizawa-155 Itsukimachi Oaza Yahata, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0003

6. Kagota: The locals’ favorite bar

A local favorite: Counter seats and warm lighting create a welcoming local atmosphere at Izakaya Kagota. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
A local favorite: Counter seats and warm lighting create a welcoming local atmosphere at Izakaya Kagota. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

Nearest Bus Stop: Aizuwakamatsu City Hall H12/A29 (3-minute walk)

Ready for dinner yet? Look no further than Izakaya Kagota. This izakaya (casual Japanese bar) is one of the most famous in Aizu-Wakamatsu. Originally just a restaurant, the owner transformed Kagota into an izakaya about 30 years ago, creating a space in the community to come together and enjoy the highest-quality local ingredients paired with the finest local sake.

Drink to your heart’s content! Only the best local sake and freshest local ingredients are served at Izakaya Kagota. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Drink to your heart’s content! Only the best local sake and freshest local ingredients are served at Izakaya Kagota. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

We recommend trying the fresh horse meat, locally-raised Aizu chicken, kozuyu (soup made with scallop dashi and various seasonal vegetables), and Nishino-no-sansho-zuke (pickled herring). Ask the master for his local sake recommendation for the perfect pairing!

Aizu-Wakamatsu specialties: kozuyu, pickled herring, and the perfectly-paired sake chosen by the owner! (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Aizu-Wakamatsu specialties: kozuyu, pickled herring, and the perfectly-paired sake chosen by the owner! (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
  • Kagota
    居酒屋籠太
    • Address 8-49 Sakaemachi, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0871
    • Phone Number 0242-32-5380
    • ・Hours: 5 PM - 10 PM
      ・Closed: Wednesdays
      ・Website: http://www.kagota.co.jp/

7. Aizu Shurakukan Watanabe Shouta Shoten: THE place to buy Aizu sake

Spacious and conveniently located near Aizu-Wakamatsu Station, Aizu Shurakukan Watanabe Shouta Shoten is a great place to start your trip or pick up some Aizu-exclusive souvenirs on the way home. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Spacious and conveniently located near Aizu-Wakamatsu Station, Aizu Shurakukan Watanabe Shouta Shoten is a great place to start your trip or pick up some Aizu-exclusive souvenirs on the way home. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

Nearest Bus Stop: Aizuwakamatsu Station H1/A1 (5-minute walk)

Before heading home, check out this large sake shop next to Aizu-Wakamatsu Station for last-minute souvenirs. With little-to-no information in English, Aizu Shurakukan is often overlooked by English-speaking visitors, but you are sure to find your perfect sake match on the shelves here.

Too many to choose! Aizu Shurakukan’s shelves are filled with only the highest-quality local sake. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)
Too many to choose! Aizu Shurakukan’s shelves are filled with only the highest-quality local sake. (Image: LIVE JAPAN Article #a3000009)

The storage room temperature is meticulously monitored year-round, ensuring the highest quality. Stocked with both classic and seasonal specialties, Aizu Shurakukan is serious about providing only the best local sake to its customers. The staff are more than happy to share their recommendations and their love of sake with visitors - just make sure that you leave enough room in your suitcase!

  • Aizu Shurakukan Watanabe Shouta Shoten
    會津酒楽館 渡辺宗太商店
    • Address 350 Byakkomachi, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-0024
    • ・Hours: 9 AM - 7 PM
      ・Closed: Tuesdays
      ・Website: https://www.souta-shoten.com/

Where to stay in Aizu-Wakamatsu

From budget-friendly hotels to lavish Japanese inns, Aizu-Wakamatsu has an accommodation for every traveler. We recommend heading to Higashiyama Onsen hot spring district for the nicest Japanese inns, or staying in the city center for conveniently located Western-style hotels.

Aizu Higashiyama Onsen Mukaitaki

An inn fit for samurai: Mukaitaki was once beloved by members of the Aizu Clan. (Photo: PIXTA)
An inn fit for samurai: Mukaitaki was once beloved by members of the Aizu Clan. (Photo: PIXTA)

Mukaitaki is a ryokan (traditional Japanese inn) located in the historic Higashiyama Onsen hot spring district.

Once used as a recreational hot spring facility for samurai of the Aizu Clan, this historic inn will transport you back in time to the Edo period. Featuring stunning wooden architecture, a Japanese garden, natural onsen (hot springs), and meals made with local ingredients and paired with local sake, Mukaitaki is the logical conclusion to a day enjoying the wonders of Aizu-Wakamatsu. Rooms are traditional Japanese-style and the onsen features communal and private indoor baths.

Shosuke-no-Yado Takinoyu

A relaxing nature retreat: You can’t get any closer to the river than at Takinoyu. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)
A relaxing nature retreat: You can’t get any closer to the river than at Takinoyu. (Photo courtesy of Expedition Japan.)

Nearest Bus Stop: Higashiyama Onsen Iriguchi (Takinoyu-mae) H28/A15 (1-minute walk)

Another ryokan in the Higashiyama Onsen area, this beautiful and spacious inn features Japanese-style rooms, as well as indoor, outdoor, and private onsen with scenic views of the waterfalls outside. The number of onsen alone makes Takinoyu one of our top picks for accommodations in Aizu-Wakamatsu.

Hotel Route-Inn Aizuwakamatsu

Nearest Bus Stop: Aizutandai Minamiguchi H37/A4 (9-minute walk)

Standard, Western-style hotel on the east side of Aizu-Wakamatsu, with the added benefits of an indoor onsen and a free breakfast buffet. This is a solid, budget-friendly option without cutting any corners when it comes to comfort.

Aizuwakamatsu Washington Hotel

Nearest Bus Stop: Aizuwakamatsu Station H1/A1 (4-minute walk)

Budget-friendly, Western-style hotel conveniently located near Aizu-Wakamatsu Station and Aizuwakamatsu Station Bus Stop. The classy restaurant and bar on the top floor offer panoramic views of the city below.

Is Aizu-Wakamatsu Worth It?

Men dressed as samurai take part in the Aizu Festival (held annually in late September), honoring Aizu-Wakamatsu’s feudal past.
Men dressed as samurai take part in the Aizu Festival (held annually in late September), honoring Aizu-Wakamatsu’s feudal past.

Only 3 hours from Tokyo and blessed with one of the most convenient sightseeing bus routes we’ve ever seen, the answer is a resounding yes. While the area is beautiful in every season, we recommend visiting in the mild spring or autumn to beat the oppressive summer heat and frosty winter winds.

Catch Aizu-Wakamatsu blanketed in pink cherry blossoms in mid-April, or the yellow and red hues of autumn foliage from late October to mid-November.

Major events in each season in Aizu-Wakamatsu
  • Tsurugajo Castle Sakura Festival (early April to early May)
  • Aizu Tajima Gion Festival (late July)
  • Aizu Festival (late September)
  • Aizu Painted Candle Festival (early February)

Recommended tours of Aizu-Wakamatsu

Whether you’re planning a multi-day stay or a one-day trip, the historic samurai culture and deliciously smooth sake of Aizu-Wakamatsu is sure to become the highlight of your time in Japan!

Written by: Sarah Dean

*This information is from the time of this article's publication.
*Prices and options mentioned are subject to change.
*Unless stated otherwise, all prices include tax.

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