• ART FRONT GALLERY
  • ART FRONT GALLERY
  • ART FRONT GALLERY
  • ART FRONT GALLERY
  • ART FRONT GALLERY

ART FRONT GALLERY

アートフロントギャラリー

Events

2 result(s)
  • Goro Murayama x Kazuto Imura : Proliferating Image

    Goro Murayama x Kazuto Imura : Proliferating Image Until 12 June 2022

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    • Dates 20 May 2022, 12:00PM - 12 June 2022, 5:00PM
    • Event Details Kazuto Imura, Goro Murayama


      We never see ourselves directly. It is only others who see us, and what they see remains inaccessible to us. Like the surface of water in ancient times, the mirror is a device that allows us to see ourselves. We usually do not remember the first time we gazed into a mirror and recognized the face in it as our own, but before long we learned that this is the face that belongs to us (that this is what we look like) and saved that knowledge to our memory. If enough time passes to let a gap emerge between the face in the mirror and the face we have committed to memory, it is like we are brought back to that first time we recognized ourselves in the mirror. I think of mirrors as feedback systems for such self-recognition. Within an infinity mirror, the images continue onward into a bottomless depth, repeating ad infinitum, a little more distant from the present moment with each iteration.
      Mirrors reflect objects placed in front of them as images. They are depthless surfaces reflecting light; to paint a mirror is to paint the image reflected in the mirror. What is a mirror without an object to reflect? After all, a mirror is named for its function, not for its materials. Kazuto Imura’s “mirror in the rough,” constructed using glass and metal, is made from the same materials as a mirror, but light scatters within it, and objects are not reflected. While mirrors appear like depthless spaces reflecting flat images, Imura’s artwork seems like an object that encapsulates light and space.
      At a time when we have grown used to (or tired of) seeing our own faces in video chats, a mirror that does not show us ourselves prompts us to appreciate once more what mirrors actually are. In his “wall-ordered” series, created using half-mirrors and self-made mirrors, an order emerges from the repetition of images in the space between the mirrors. These box-like, deep artworks have no object to reflect; they are mirrors reflecting mirrors. Somewhere between the mirror plates, geometric rules let a microscopic virtual space emerge. And like with “mirror in the rough,” the gaze of the viewer sinks down into the deep darkness of the proliferating space.

      Goro Murayama’s practice employs systems to introduce complicated and life-like behaviors into the process with which he creates his works. Instead of placing every aspect under the complete control of the artist, Murayama tries to use random and iterative mechanisms to facilitate organic rhizomatic change during the production of a work. However, his approach does not aim to de-center or remove the artist by entrusting the production of the work to systems. Rather, it is a systems-based approach in which the artist’s direct input becomes one variable among many to influence the final state of the artwork.
      Murayama takes inspiration from the cellular automaton, a mathematical model to repeatedly calculate how the state of a cell in a grid changes depending on its neighboring cells, with complex patterns emerging from the sum of these changes. In a sense, Murayama acts as a human-powered computer as he reflects these arithmetic processes in his work. His mural paintings are representations of a class 4 cellular automaton (as defined by Stephen Wolfram), in which periodic and chaotic patterns exhibit the kind of complex behaviors found at the root of natural phenomena such as life, and that are considered the foundation of complex systems science.
      From drawings and paintings to textile pieces, Murayama creates his computer simulation-themed works by hand. Even though he makes use of external systems to produce his artworks, they remain subject to the influence of various chance events and conditions introduced by the artist’s manual involvement and by the materials and technologies used. The circumstance that Murayama’s process also involves creating the very canvases that shape and define his works is perhaps further evidence of his iterative methodology. On the other hand, it may hint at the fact that Murayama’s practice also express a body rebelling against the systems that engage with it.

      — Minoru Hatanaka (chief curator of the NTT InterCommunication Center (ICC))
  • Takanao Kaneko: Fragment

    Takanao Kaneko: Fragment Until 12 June 2022

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    • Dates 20 May 2022, 12:00PM - 12 June 2022, 5:00PM
    • Event Details Art Front Gallery is pleased to announce upcoming exhibit “Takanao Kaneko: Fragment”. Kaneko attracts more attention than before in present social situation of information diffusion. His character which looks comical but questioning the embodiment of information is charming “monster” in the present society with noise.
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