Origami: The Art of Paper Folding

Origami: The Art of Paper Folding

Update: 27 March 2017

In Japan, the tradition of folding square-shaped paper to make various shapes is known as origami. This form of paper artwork can range from simple to complex. Cranes, hats, animals, flowers, and shuriken are among the most common and traditional origami creations you may come across.

The main keys to remember when doing origami is to fold not only in the correct places, but also in the proper order.

A Skill Learned from Childhood

A Skill Learned from Childhood

It is very common for Japanese children to learn origami at kindergarten age, starting with simple figures, and moving on to the more complex as they improve their skills. A person who is skilled at origami can make a crane in just a few short minutes, and a kabuto (helmet) in as little as 30 seconds.

Lucky Origami

Lucky Origami

It is believed that string of 1,000 paper cranes is a symbol of longevity. It is also traditional to give this to people who are ill or hospitalized, as a way to wish for their recovery and a long, healthy life.

Chiyogami

Chiyogami

Originally, origami was always folded with a colorful type of Japanese paper called ‘chiyogami.’ During the early days of origami, the craft itself was actually referred to by this name as well. Even today, chiyogami can be seen in souvenir shops in Japan.

Why not try your hand at making some origami for yourself?

*This information is from the time of this article's publication.

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